Need for Health Care Strategy for Seniors

The Canadian Medical Association (see below) has joined the Canadian Health Coalition in calling for a Seniors Health Strategy. The CHC held a conference on this issue and documents are available at http://healthcoalition.ca/main/resources/a-seniors-health-care-plan/

As the Canada Health Care Accord expired at the end of March 2014, many such Dr. Jeff Turnbull have called for federal leadership to deal with the increasingly critical health issues such as an aging population.

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/Calls+grow+leadership+national+health+accord+expires/9682915/story.html


 

http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/1331509/statement-by-dr-louis-hugo-francescutti-president-canadian-medical-association-end-of-the-2004-canada-health-accord-calls-out-need-for-strategy-on-sen

Statement by Dr. Louis Hugo Francescutti, President, Canadian Medical Association – End of the 2004 Canada Health Accord calls out need for strategy on seniors’ health care

OTTAWAMarch 31, 2014 /CNW/ – The 10-year Canada Health Accord has now wrapped up and there are many who are pointing to its demise as a death knell for Canada’s health care system. Still others question whether the $41-billion agreement represented smart spending for the benefit of the Canadian health care system. Regardless, the accord did help focus federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together on the same roadmap to quality, patient-centred health care. We must all come together now to face our biggest challenge: ensuring adequate care is available for our rapidly aging population. The clock is ticking. The leading edge of the baby boom generation will reach the age of 75 in 2021. Annual average per capita health costs will jump by more than one third (36%) once these seniors enter the 75-79 age group and costs will continue to escalate after that.

Canadians and their governments must realize that no amount of spending — and no amount of cost cutting — will meet this challenge unless our governments learn to work together again for the benefit of Canadians’ health and wellness. This means Ottawa, as the fifth largest provider/purchaser of health care services, must take a central role.

Our governments — federal, provincial and territorial — must resume working together for the welfare of Canadians. A panCanadian strategy for seniors health care would be a very good place to start.

SOURCE Canadian Medical Association

 

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